Tag: linkedin profiles

How to Choose the Right LinkedIn Photo

LinkedIn HeadshotSo you’ve added a solid Summary, Headline, and Experience to your LinkedIn Profile. What’s next?

A great headshot that exudes leadership qualities, conveys confidence, and makes employers eager to meet you.

If you’re unsure how to select a photo for your LinkedIn Profile, you have plenty of company. Many job seekers pull in a hastily cropped family photograph or select a picture with a vacation scene, rather than taking the time to use the right LinkedIn headshot.

However, just like your best interview suit or a powerfully written Profile, a positive, personality-infused LinkedIn photo can make a great first impression. These tips will help you avoid a LinkedIn photo disaster (especially the kind that turns off potential employers): Continue reading “How to Choose the Right LinkedIn Photo”

How to Convey Your Leadership Brand in Your LinkedIn Profile

Put together a barely-there LinkedIn Profile, but you’re not sure how to expand it or make it stronger?

Nearly every executive I speak with laments the lack of time and ideas for creating an engaging, interesting LinkedIn presence.

Yet, all it takes is a quick glance at your Profile, changing it section by section, until you’re happy with the final result.

Try these strategies for building a strong, relevant portrait of your executive competencies on LinkedIn:

Continue reading “How to Convey Your Leadership Brand in Your LinkedIn Profile”

3 Ways to Update Your LinkedIn Profile on The Sly

 

Want to use LinkedIn for your job search, but afraid that your employer will find out?

Worried that your boss or colleagues will react to changes in your Profile?

You probably know there’s no way to make your LinkedIn Profile 100% private; however, these tips will help you update LinkedIn during your job search – without giving yourself away: Continue reading “3 Ways to Update Your LinkedIn Profile on The Sly”

How to Stop Your Work Anniversary Notifications on LinkedIn

Annoyed with the flood of “Congratulations!” notes on LinkedIn every time your work anniversary rolls around?

Try removing the Months on your jobs in the Experience section. Navigate to the job on LinkedIn, click the pencil icon to edit the dates, and select “Choose” instead of specifying the month. Hit Save and you’re done!

I have to admit – I typically use just years, rather than a month/year combination in my executive and professional resumes, which is why I rarely encounter issues like this one.

But I digress… don’t stop at this change if LinkedIn isn’t producing the results you want.

Tune your Profile to your advantage with these tips:

Trash These 7 Phrases on Your LinkedIn Profile

Make Your LinkedIn Photo Shout Your Personal Brand

Update Your LinkedIn Profile on The Sly

Write a Memorable, Knockout LinkedIn Profile Summary

Take These 5 Worthless Phrases OUT of Your LinkedIn Headline

Is Your LinkedIn Photo a Joke? Change It!

Avoid the #1 LinkedIn Headline Mistake

In a nutshell, use the right type of message and content on LinkedIn to attract your target audience and keep the focus where you want it: on your qualifications.

Executive Resume Writing Services

Need a competitive edge in your job search? My clients win interviews at Fortune 500 firms including Citibank, Google, Disney, and Pfizer, plus niche companies, start-ups, and emerging industry leaders.

As an award-winning executive resume writer and a former recruiter, I create branded, powerful resumes and LinkedIn Profiles that position you as the #1 candidate.

Get in touch with me to experience the outstanding results I can bring to your career transition.

– Laura Smith-Proulx, CCMC, CPRW, CPBA, TCCS, COPNS, CIC, CTTCC

4 Things I Shouldn’t See In Your LinkedIn Photo

wrong_linkedin_photo

Putting your best foot forward on LinkedIn?

Not if you’re hunting through your phone or searching family pictures for your avatar.

If your photo doesn’t enhance your credibility, it CAN hurt your job search. This especially true if you’re posting any old photo without giving it serious thought.

These items should NOT take center stage in your LinkedIn likeness:

 

LinkedIn_Photo_Shoulder1 – Your spouse’s shoulder.

Standing close enough to another person that their hair, shoulder, or cheek can be seen in your photo? Busted!

Cropping yourself out of a party shot, family photo, or other group picture implies that you’re uploading any available shot to LinkedIn.

However, employers might assume you’ll take the same off-the-cuff approach to your career. Get past your reluctance to have your photo taken by asking a friend to take some flattering shots or by visiting a pro.

(Note: even a businesslike “selfie” is preferable to cropping yourself out of the family reunion.)

 

2 – Your kitchen.

Hey, I love your style! However, LinkedIn photos should represent your business side, not your taste for interior decorating.

Consider using a shot that shows your “work personality,” incorporating the backdrop of your office, manufacturing facility,  boardroom, or laboratory. Even a great outdoor pose can strike the right note.

 

3 – Too much of YOU.

You certainly wouldn’t wear a revealing blouse to your interview, so why show this on LinkedIn? (OK, please don’t show this on LinkedIn.)

What if hiring managers in your field have an old-school approach to vetting candidates? You won’t find out, other than being excluded for a job opportunity.

So, save the tank top, glamour shot, or strapless dress for another use.

 

LinkedIn_Selfie4 – Your wide-eyed selfie.

Maybe you CAN take a great picture of yourself… or maybe not.

If you’re wearing an air of surprise or the background appears distorted, your selfie is not doing you any favors.

Consider asking a friend to snap a few shots of you in different areas and lighting conditions. The same friend can also give a thumbs-up to your attire, expression, and demeanor in the photo you select for LinkedIn.

So, what’s the best alternative to these LinkedIn photo fails? 

You can’t go wrong with job interview attire or clothing typical of your workday (open-collar shirt, suit and tie, blouse and sweater, etc.). Pick a shot that represents your best “work personality.”

This way, you’ll be sure to attract the right kind of attention, demonstrating your intent as a serious contender for a new, challenging professional role.

Executive Resume Writer

Need a competitive edge in your job search? As an award-winning executive resume writer, I create branded, powerful resumes and LinkedIn Profiles that position you as the #1 candidate.

My clients win interviews and top C-suite, EVP, VP, and Director positions at Fortune 500 firms, niche companies, start-ups, and emerging industry leaders, enjoying the competitive advantage of powerhouse documents and executive job search techniques tailored to today’s job market.

Get in touch with me to experience the outstanding results I can bring to your transition.

– Laura Smith-Proulx, CCMC, CPRW, CPBA, TCCS, COPNS, CIC, CTTCC

 

How to Block Stalkers on LinkedIn

Blocking LinkedIn Stalkers

Waiting for a way to block specific users on LinkedIn? You’ll be happy to hear about LinkedIn’s new Member Blocking feature, which was announced in February 2014.

Hailed by account holders as a significant improvement, Member Blocking allows you to prevent another user from viewing your professional details.

The feature was built in response to a growing volume of requests from LinkedIn users who found that their workplaces, location, and other details were viewable to potentially dangerous contacts.

Member Blocking requires that you visit the Profile page of the offending party, and choose the “Block or report” option from the Send InMail dropdown list.

There’s a bit more to know, however:  here’s the lowdown on what REALLY happens when you block another member, with steps to take if you truly want to avoid releasing details to a potential stalker: Continue reading “How to Block Stalkers on LinkedIn”

What’s the Secret to Getting Hired From LinkedIn? (Part 3: Analyzing Your Competition)

LinkedIn CompetitionWondering if LinkedIn will REALLY help you land your next job? This strategy is another part of my series in answering these common LinkedIn job search questions:  

“Why are others getting hired off LinkedIn, but not me? What am I doing wrong?”

Part 1 (Build More Connections) and Part 2 (Set Your Strategy for Groups) may already be actions you’ve missed.

Here’s the next step in maximizing LinkedIn for your job search:

3 – You DO need to use LinkedIn to check out your competition.

Let’s say you applied to 12 jobs last month on LinkedIn, but you didn’t hear anything back. Now what?

First of all, figure out who your competition was for these jobs. That’s right – I’m suggesting you look for candidates the same way recruiters would look for YOU.

Use the “search for people, jobs, companies, more…” function at the top of your LinkedIn page, but click on Advanced next to it for a more robust search.

Enter Keywords, Job Titles, and other criteria; change these until you get the most likely candidates for your target jobs (people with job titles and locations similar to yours). Now, you’re looking at your competition!

Do you see any consistent pattern in their skills or career backgrounds that differ from yours? If so, you may need to either adjust your career goal, or set out to learn new competencies.

After all, if you can find these job hunters, so can recruiters.

If you don’t take these steps, you’ll continue to apply to jobs on LinkedIn, and continue to be passed over in favor of these candidates.

Up next: What’s the Secret to Getting Hired From LinkedIn? (Part 4: Improving Your Findability)

Need a competitive edge in your job search?

As an award-winning executive resume writer, I create branded, powerful resumes and LinkedIn Profiles that position you as the #1 candidate – PLUS arm you with the job search tools that will get you hired faster.

My clients win interviews at Fortune 500 firms including Citibank, Google, Disney, and Pfizer, plus niche companies, start-ups, and emerging industry leaders.

Get in touch with me to experience the outstanding results my expertise can bring to your transition.

– Laura Smith-Proulx, CCMC, CPRW, CPBA, TCCS, COPNS, CIC 

What’s the Secret to Getting Hired From LinkedIn? (Part 2: Setting Your Strategy for Groups)

This strategy is part of a series I’ve developed in response to these classic LinkedIn job search questions: 

“Why are others getting hired off LinkedIn, but not me? What am I doing wrong?”

In Part 1: Your Connections, I explained why you MUST build more Connections–even if this seems a simplistic strategy–because doing so will boost your findability and reputation.

Here’s more of what’s needed to make LinkedIn to work harder for your job search:

2 – You DO need to get involved in Groups.

Rather than just joining Groups that represent your personal interests, religion, or current job, consider the Groups that represent your goals.

Where are you headed in your career? What job do you expect to have 10-15 years into the future?

Now join those Groups—the ones that contain like-minded people who’ve already arrived at your career goalpost, or who are likely to be the people you need to use as role models for your ultimate objective.

Get to know them; send a LinkedIn invitation to them and explain why you’re interested in connecting, and how you read their blog, admire their company, or share an alma mater. Find something in common and touch base from time to time.

Participate in these new Groups, instead of being the quiet lurker no one knows. Post an occasional article that reflects your professional views, and ask others for their input. Write an article and after you’ve successfully published it in your field, circulate it in your Groups.

Continue to join additional Groups, study their member behaviors, participate in the dialogue, and circulate information.

THIS is the strong path that leads to becoming a thought leader in your industry! Will it get you noticed? Absolutely – you’ll see a rise in your traffic and Connection volume.

Will it get you hired? You’ll never know unless you try it.

Up next: What’s the Secret to Getting Hired From LinkedIn? (Part 3: Analyzing Your Competition)

Need a competitive edge in your job search?

As an award-winning executive resume writer, I create branded, powerful resumes and LinkedIn Profiles that position you as the #1 candidate – PLUS arm you with the job search tools that will get you hired faster.

My clients win interviews at Fortune 500 firms including Citibank, Google, Disney, and Pfizer, plus niche companies, start-ups, and emerging industry leaders.

Get in touch with me to experience the outstanding results my expertise can bring to your transition.

– Laura Smith-Proulx, CCMC, CPRW, CPBA, TCCS, COPNS, CIC 

Are You Making This Critical Mistake on LinkedIn?

LinkedIn MistakeDumping your resume content straight into each section of LinkedIn—and calling it done?

If you’re still assuming that your resume will stand in for your Profile, you’re doing yourself (and your job search) a disservice.

Here’s why: your resume might be well-written and contain solid achievements—but that doesn’t mean it was developed for online reading or recruiter searches.

Here are 3 compelling reasons that plopping your resume into LinkedIn is a significant mistake: Continue reading “Are You Making This Critical Mistake on LinkedIn?”

7 LinkedIn Photos That Can Keep You From Landing a Job

Bad LinkedIn PhotoWhat’s standing in your way of landing the perfect position?

It might be your LinkedIn headshot.

You might find putting your headshot on a public forum to be daunting… but if you don’t put serious thought into your  photo, disastrous results can follow.

Don’t blame it on the economy, your age, or experience! Failing to display a professional image online WILL affect your job search.

If your LinkedIn photo shows ANY of the following, employers may refrain from reaching out to you – especially if your target job requires a professional, client-facing demeanor: Continue reading “7 LinkedIn Photos That Can Keep You From Landing a Job”