LinkedIn Resume Assistant: Will It Help You Create a Strong Resume?

LinkedIn Resume Assistant

It’s here! LinkedIn’s new Artificial Intelligence-powered resume tool, Resume Assistant, has rolled out to Office 365 users.

By promising to ease the challenge of writing your resume, this new capability has caught the attention of many job hunters.

However, Resume Assistant is much like any tool purported to streamline your job search: it works best when you see it as another way to improve the process, not as a means of handing off the process itself.

Here are the pros and cons of using LinkedIn Resume Assistant to develop a compelling resume:

1 – LinkedIn Resume Assistant can cut down on your keyword research efforts.

Keywords dials businessman on computer .When you’re embarking on a job hunt, gathering keywords from job postings is an important step for your resume. By quickly generating a list of skills and other relevant terms found in LinkedIn jobs and other Profiles, Resume Assistant can help make this research more manageable.

A caveat:  many LinkedIn users fail to fully populate the site with valuable information, so you might get repetitive and mundane results (such as Operations Management for a COO or Budgeting for an Accountant).

A look at the Profiles of your most skilled colleagues or connections could yield better insights. Don’t forget to use other job boards, too, such as or Glassdoor.

2 – LinkedIn Resume Assistant will appear automatically if you open an Office 365 Word resume template.

And this is NOT a good thing. Rather than trying to populate a basic template, you’ll fare better with a customized presentation. Think of the reasons you’d tailor any important business document to the subject, target audience, and purpose. Your resume is of equal, if not greater importance!

When you limit yourself to the resume templates found in the Office 365 application, you’re showing employers a lack of imagination and resourcefulness. See How to Write a Standout Executive Resume for additional ways to distinguish yourself on a resume.

3 – LinkedIn Resume Assistant helps research competing LinkedIn Profiles for you.

LinkedIn_investigationIf you’re not already using LinkedIn to assess your job-seeking competition, you’re missing an important exercise. Not only will LinkedIn research help you gauge whether your career goals are realistic, you’ll also be able to identify unique capabilities for use on your resume.

Resume Assistant will match your job title to that of similar LinkedIn users, and show you snippets of their work history. It will also generate detail from LinkedIn Jobs that align with your experience and career stature. The idea is to jog your memory and prompt you to write keyword-specific resume content, enabling you to compete among professionals at the same level.

4 – LinkedIn Resume Assistant is NOT intended to encourage copying.

No matter how you look at it, taking someone else’s resume or LinkedIn content is plagiarism, and LinkedIn takes this very seriously (read their Copyright Policy, complete with procedures for filing a claim).

If you’re stumped for ideas, look at job postings or even resume samples for inspiration. Often, you’ll see achievements or projects that will remind you of your own success stories. The idea in using Resume Assistant is the same:  you may have forgotten to note important facets of your work, such as the size of teams you’ve managed or new initiatives you’ve led.

This information is presented to help you recall important detail from past positions, education, or volunteer experience, NOT to claim it as your own.

5 – LinkedIn Resume Assistant won’t help you brand yourself.

ex_pickme2This is probably the biggest objection most marketers have when it comes to Resume Assistant: a truly powerful and effective resume should distinguish you from others, not enable you to mimic them.

Want to make employers sit up straight when they get your resume? Then spend time on both keyword research from Resume Assistant and the hard work of real resume writing, where you develop power-packed success stories as proof of your performance.

If you find this part difficult, try a classic storytelling method such as Challenge-Action-Result (CAR). This technique helps you describe career wins by noting the Challenge or situation you faced, the Actions taken to resolve it, and the Result or business benefit to your employer.

You’ll see examples of achievement statements, quantifiable metrics, and powerful brand messaging in this sample CEO resume.

So, take time to check out LinkedIn Resume Assistant to see what it will show you for keywords and competitive research.

Spend even MORE time writing about your own personal qualities, strengths, and accomplishments for a resume that truly gets results.

Executive Resume Writer

Need a competitive edge in your job search? As an award-winning executive resume writer, I create branded, powerful resumes and LinkedIn Profiles that position you as the #1 candidate.

My clients win interviews and top C-suite, EVP, VP, and Director positions at Fortune 500 firms, niche companies, start-ups, and emerging industry leaders, enjoying the competitive advantage of powerhouse documents and executive job search techniques tailored to today’s job market.

Get in touch with me to experience the outstanding results I can bring to your transition.



Executive Resume Trends 2018: What Will Make You Stand Out?

resume trends 2018

No matter how you job hunt in 2018, you’ll STILL be asked for an executive resume – and the competition will be fierce.

Even if you use social media to convey work history or tap into great opportunities in your network, your resume remains the cornerstone of a well-planned job search.

By incorporating these key elements into a fresh, competitively designed executive resume, you’ll stand out among other leaders in 2018:

2018 Resume Trend: A Clear Focus on Your Passion.

What drives you? What type of work or challenges make you excited to come into the office? How do you inspire passion in your teams or customers? This is the kind of information employers seek about you – and it should land on the front page of your executive resume.

It’s no longer enough to state that you’ve directed teams of a particular size or managed millions in budget. Recruiters are looking for your ability to motivate teams, influence Boards, and shape customer reactions.

If you’re unsure how to convey this information, use these questions to kickstart the process:

  • What distinguishes you from the person who preceded you at your company?
  • How did you get started in this line of work?
  • What should employers know about you almost immediately?
  • How do you select and motivate the right kind of talent?
  • What legacy do you want to leave at the end of your career?

Next, take your findings and write a brief statement that sums up your answer, as shown in these examples for a Chief Technology Officer or consumer products industry Board member:

Lifelong technology evangelist and innovator commercializing profitable, disruptive products

Board member with strategic outlook on fast-paced CPG sectors

2018 Resume Trend:  A Quick-Read Synopsis of Your Career Wins.

Like this TORI award-winning resume for a Chief Revenue Officer, you can incorporate a short listing of achievements that demonstrate career highs. Here, a selection of quantifiable accomplishments are listed under the heading: Generated #1 Revenue & Customer Churn Metrics for 16 Straight Quarters.

You can easily build your own list of notable success stories by condensing significant achievements down into areas of strength, such as Sales Growth or Employee Retention.

Next, add metrics that demonstrate your expertise (45% Year-Over-Year Gains or 98% Team Engagement Scores). By providing quantifiable figures, you’ll show leadership-worthy detail that backs up your value proposition to employers.

2018 Resume Trend:  Use of Symbols & Headlines.

There’s more than one way to demonstrate your fitness for a specific industry or career level, as shown in this example of a CEO and CEO resume in the healthcare field (see the full CEO-COO resume here). To describe his area of focus, a simple symbol and headline noting his specialties were incorporated at the top of the document:


Resume headlines are one of the best ways to convey salient points of your background, while preserving space for other relevant details.

To create headlines for your executive resume, jot down short sentences or phrases that encapsulate what you do best, such as Driving Growth in Americas Region. You can also describe yourself in third-person, as shown in the example above (Highly Engaged Leader With Passion for Business Vision).

Don’t resort to boring section titles! Instead, insert headlines like Examples of Technology Leadership to introduce your achievements.

2018 Resume Trend:  A Concise Summary of Your Brand.

Like any marketing tool, your executive resume must drive home your point – fast. If you’re still using a long and winding Summary of Qualifications, start over and jot down just a few of your core strengths and achievements.

Use this data to rework the top part of your resume into a brief (and power-packed) set of brand statements. Now, you’ll be able to provide employers a quick glimpse into your executive value, saving time and compelling them to read further.

Not convinced? See how quickly you can digest the following executive resume summaries:

Accomplished technology executive with extensive experience in designing, development, and implementation of high-performance technology solutions. Proven ability to bring the benefits of IT to solve business issues while delivering application and infrastructure performance. Experienced in cross-functional team management, problem-solving, contract negotiations, and crisis management. Well-rounded infrastructure, software and data management, application development, IT financial reporting, security, and project management skills.

Vs. this shorter, tighter version:

Strategic, resourceful IT leader behind cost-controlled business improvements – upgrading infrastructure, ensuring right-fit applications, optimizing network operations, eliciting top vendor performance, and building lean, skilled teams. Strong financial and budget expertise; builds viable justification for IT investments.

As you can see, your executive resume summary must be a quick read, supplying just enough data to avoid losing the reader.

2018 Resume Trend: A Short, Powerful Story of Your Achievements.

Face it, no one has the time or interest to read a 7-page novel of your accomplishments. By culling success stories to hard-hitting statements, you’ll show employers the ability to focus on relevant points.

Most executive resumes can fit squarely into 2 or perhaps 3 pages. If you decide to offer additional detail, make sure your document is easy to navigate. As an example, this CEO resume uses a first-page summary-only strategy to introduce the candidate, with subsequent pages providing additional details.

If you struggle to condense your story into a tightly written executive resume, try reworking parts of your history into “sound bites” that capture the actions you took and the end results, using these examples for inspiration:

Delivered 42% year-over-year profit by focusing manufacturing teams on top 8 product lines and rationalizing underperforming products.

Exceeded profit records up to 34% and reached peak satisfaction scores from new relationship building efforts among Fortune 500 customers.

2018 Resume Trend:  Using Color to Set Off Important Data.

I’ve said this many times, but it bears repeating: black-and-white documents heavy with detail are easier to skim if you’ve added a bit of color.

Your executive resume needn’t employ flashing lights and neon green, however, in order to make your point. Step into the use of color by altering your resume headlines with a subtle blue or shading a few areas for emphasis, as shown in this example of  a Finance leadership resume:


By easing the navigation required to digest the most notable parts of your work history and success stories, you can quickly set off important points, allowing recruiters to see snapshots of value that illustrate your readiness for a new position.

In summary, there’s numerous ways to restructure your executive resume for a clear, attention-getting message. 

Make 2018 a banner year by capturing your personal brand in an innovative, content-rich executive resume.

Executive Resume Writer

Need a competitive edge in your job search? As an award-winning executive resume writer, I create branded, powerful resumes and LinkedIn Profiles that position you as the #1 candidate.

My clients win interviews and top C-suite, EVP, VP, and Director positions at Fortune 500 firms, niche companies, start-ups, and emerging industry leaders, enjoying the competitive advantage of powerhouse documents and executive job search techniques tailored to today’s job market.

Get in touch with me to experience the outstanding results I can bring to your transition.



Why You’ll Benefit From Using LinkedIn Publishing for Your Job Search

LinkedIn Publishing PlatformIf you haven’t tried LinkedIn’s Publishing platform for your job search, you’re missing a HUGE opportunity to promote your personal brand and leadership skills to employers.

There’s no limit to the topics or volume of posts allowed per user, and with an international recruiting audience ready at your virtual feet, there’s no reason to hold back!

Still hesitant? Consider these near-instant benefits to your job search from publishing: Continue reading “Why You’ll Benefit From Using LinkedIn Publishing for Your Job Search”

Executives, Are You Rejecting LinkedIn Connection Requests?

Declining requests to connect because you “don’t know” other users? It’s time to reconsider.

LinkedIn isn’t a tell-all social media site (like Facebook, where you’re often judged by the quality of the company you keep).

Instead, think of the site as a massive, ongoing business networking meeting, where the more people you reach, the more exposure you’ll receive as a leader and executive job seeker. 

Online networking can be a boon for your executive job search – and the sooner you change your approach, the faster you could land a new job. Here are 5 reasons to quit rejecting connection requests on LinkedIn, particularly if you’re in the market for a new leadership opportunity: Continue reading “Executives, Are You Rejecting LinkedIn Connection Requests?”

How to Optimize Your Executive LinkedIn Profile for SEO

LinkedIn Profile SEOIn case you haven’t heard, LinkedIn now has 500+ million members – establishing itself as a hotbed of job search activity, with recruiters pursuing candidates and job seekers vying for attention from hiring decision-makers.

With such fierce competition, you’ll need to employ aggressive keyword and SEO strategies in order to be found for a choice job.

Here are the best ways to boost your findability on LinkedIn and optimize your Profile for SEO, including search algorithm strategy and keyword adjustments: Continue reading “How to Optimize Your Executive LinkedIn Profile for SEO”

A Fast Formula for a Powerful LinkedIn Headline

How to write your LinkedIn HeadlineFar from being just a placeholder, your LinkedIn Profile Headline has an important job to do.

If adjusted to market you effectively, it can represent your personal brand and become an online promotional workhorse.

The most highly indexed part of your Profile (next to your name), your Headline allows recruiters and employers to locate you, based on the search terms or keywords you specify… so if you’ve filled in only part of the Headline or let LinkedIn populate it with your current job title (the default value), you could be missing out on valuable traffic to your Profile. Don’t let that happen!

Instead, use as many of the 120 characters available in your Headline – ensuring that it represents your career level and personal brand, while distinguishing you from your competition. Try the following formula when you’re stumped for an effective LinkedIn Headline that leverages your industry expertise, achievements, and keywords: Continue reading “A Fast Formula for a Powerful LinkedIn Headline”

Did You Fall for These Resume Myths?

Falling for these resume myths
No matter how much advice is published on the subject, some myths still circulate about the best way to write your resume.
Fortunately, a lot has changed in resume writing and job search – and you can benefit from these new trends.

For example, you might have been told to keep your resume to a specified length or to always exclude certain types of information. Given how much has changed in the job market, many of these “rules” have fallen by the wayside.

Take a look at the longstanding myths and misconceptions about resume writing, then see which of these apply to your own resume: Continue reading “Did You Fall for These Resume Myths?”

5 Keys to Winning Your Next Executive Job

How to win executive jobMoving up to the corner office – or seeking a change in your executive role?

If you haven’t stayed on top of the latest trends in the competitive world of executive job search, prepare to be surprised! 

A strong social media presence, keyword-rich executive resume, cutting-edge search methods, and intensive follow-up are now required to land a choice leadership position.

Here are 5-must-know trends and search tips to help you access and win your next executive opportunity:

Continue reading “5 Keys to Winning Your Next Executive Job”

3 Phrases That Kill The Effectiveness of Your Executive Resume

Want to distinguish your leadership brand among competing candidates?

Then ditch the boring language you’ve seen on other executive resumes.

Just because other resumes (professionally created or self-written) employ a blend of monotonous, overused words doesn’t mean you have to follow suit.

Shake things up and inject some power into your personal brand message by refusing to add these mundane descriptors to your executive resume: Continue reading “3 Phrases That Kill The Effectiveness of Your Executive Resume”

The 5 Most Worthless Phrases in Your LinkedIn Headline

LinkedIn HeadlineYour LinkedIn Headline is arguably the most important piece of real estate within your Profile.
Yet, many LinkedIn users remain confused how to best use the Headline or how to optimize it for maximum site traffic.

LinkedIn’s search algorithm ranks your Headline as the top indexed field in your Profile (second only to your name). In other words, out of all the data on your Profile, this field is weighted most heavily in user searches.

Therefore, you’ll want to consider carefully what you use in this field (and avoid using the default value, which is your current job title).

In addition, your Headline is first piece of information others will see when communicating with you! You only have to navigate LinkedIn briefly to see other Headlines displayed prominently under their names in nearly every part of the site.

Here, then, is a list of the most meaningless words you can put in your Headline (unfortunately, these were found in actual Profiles), plus some suggestions for stronger alternatives:
Continue reading “The 5 Most Worthless Phrases in Your LinkedIn Headline”