Do You Really Need a Cover Letter For Executive Jobs?

Invariably, when executives try to figure out how to stand out in the job search, the subject of cover letters comes up – followed by confusion. Do you really need a cover letter for each executive job application? How can you be sure that employers are actually reading the letter you’re so carefully crafting?

cover letter for executives
Do you really need a cover letter for executive jobs?

Is it a myth that a cover letter can distinguish you in the executive job search? Here are 3 key points to consider when it comes to the cover letter question:

1 – Yes, cover letters are read by (some) employers.

However, this varies among different companies and their hiring practices. This informal survey from About.com shows some hiring managers are emphatic that a great cover letter will boost your chances of being selected for a choice interview. Studies in the careers industry also consistently nearly two-thirds of hiring authorities read cover letters, and of that group, nearly 50% consider them crucial.  You’ll never know at the outset which third of hiring managers you’re dealing with, of course. Therefore, it’s better to be prepared with a strong personal brand message encapsulated in a cover letter, than to lose out on a great opportunity.  Continue reading “Do You Really Need a Cover Letter For Executive Jobs?”

How to Find Recruiters For Your Job Search

executiverecruiterPerhaps you’ve decided to reach out to recruiters as a means of accessing potential opportunities at your leadership career level.

If so, how do you find the best executive recruiters for your situation? Many recruiters work nationally and globally, making it difficult to pinpoint the best resources.

You can get in touch with colleagues for a referral, as suggested by the NY Times in Recruiting a Recruiter for Your Next Job, which also outlines steps to take once you’ve found a good contact name.

(Of course, since executive recruiters are tasked with identifying optimum leadership candidates for their client companies, there will also be due diligence on their part to vet YOU.)

With a little resourcefulness, you can also perform online searches to find and build relationships with executive recruiters who are familiar with your field (and potentially, your target companies).

Try these 3 resources to identify potential recruiting agencies for your executive job search:

1 – Locate Recruiters Using LinkedIn.

Executive recruiters are easily findable on LinkedIn with a few simple search techniques. First of all, get familiar with the Advanced People Search function (which will make your life easier throughout your job search).

From any page in LinkedIn, you will see a  use the drop-down menu at the top right, which typically defaults to ”People.” Next to it, you’ll see Advanced – click on this word to access Advanced People Search. Continue reading “How to Find Recruiters For Your Job Search”

3 Ways You’re Turning Off Recruiters on LinkedIn

Ready to make LinkedIn work harder for you… but unsure how to generate activity from the site?

Confused as to why your Profile viewers never get in touch with you?

LinkedIn will have a tremendous impact on your job search – generating new Connections, recruiter calls, and networking opportunities – but this only happens when you actively cultivate your Profile as a keyword-rich, career-specific presentation that wows employers.

Here’s a list of ways you might be dissuading hiring authorities from reaching out to you online: Continue reading “3 Ways You’re Turning Off Recruiters on LinkedIn”

Are You Over-Sharing On LinkedIn?

LinkedIn—that all-purpose gathering place for professionals, recruiters, and employers—allows you to converse with like-minded experts in your field, learn about industry-specific topics and events, post resume information, and send private messages to employers in hopes of securing that perfect job.

However, if you’re divulging too-personal details, or letting others have uncomfortably close insight into your job search, it can take longer to find a suitable job – or you can be blacklisted entirely by recruiters.

If you’ve started to confuse LinkedIn connections for your Facebook friends, it’s time to take a step back and consider whether you’re harming your job search.

Here are some signs that you’re wading too deep into personal territory on LinkedIn:

1 – Posting negative comments about your job search in a LinkedIn Group.

While it’s perfectly normal to be frustrated with a job search that’s taking too long, LinkedIn is not the place to blow off steam about prospective employers, HR contacts, or recruiters.

Yet, you can peruse Groups forums and find this type of activity nearly every day, with disgruntled professionals posting information about negative exchanges with employers, and the occasional rant against a particular company or hiring manager. Continue reading “Are You Over-Sharing On LinkedIn?”

Who’s Viewed Your Profile on LinkedIn – And What Do They Want?

Scroll down the sidebar of your LinkedIn Home Page, and you’ll eventually notice the blurb that asks “Who’s Viewed Your Profile?”

If you click on it, you’ll see a page entitled Profile Stats, which is designed to show you other users that have looked at your information.

To get a glimpse of who is searching for you, you’ll want to leverage Profile Stats.

Start by changing LinkedIn Profile Settings (hover the mouse near your name at the top of the page to click on Settings).

Click on “Select what others see when you’ve viewed their profile” and choose Your Name and Headline (recommended) to allow others to see YOUR information when you review THEIR profiles.

Now, on to the good stuff: there are common categories of users who are surfing your Profile (right now!). Go to Profile Stats to see the types of LinkedIn users who are looking for you – and why: Continue reading “Who’s Viewed Your Profile on LinkedIn – And What Do They Want?”

3 Tips to Fire Up Your 2012 Job Search

Looking forward to your 2012 job hunt – or dreading more of the same old, same old?

If you’ve spent time job searching in 2011, or are facing a pending layoff, the start of a New Year might not seem exciting or even particularly inspiring.

However, there’s good reasons to reconsider what you might have read or experienced in 2011 – plus ways to drive your job search forward and stay focused on your goal for the coming year:

1 – Realize that companies ARE hiring.

As badly as you want to find the perfect fit in your next job, companies want to find YOU.

Don’t believe this? Run a Google search on the phrase “How to find candidates on LinkedIn.” Out of the 14 million or so results, you’ll see thousands of articles on recruiting.

What this tells you is that there are plenty of companies searching for your talent. Therefore, if you haven’t already optimized your LinkedIn Profile for key search terms, it’s time to get going. Continue reading “3 Tips to Fire Up Your 2012 Job Search”

Why Just Joining LinkedIn Is Not Enough

If you’re like many job hunters today, you’ve heard the buzz about LinkedIn as a must-use job hunting tool that can help land your next gig.

Yet, you might have signed up for a Profile at the site, looked around a bit, and then wondered, “What am I missing?”

The truth is, if you’ve only just joined and are standing back at a distance to observe, what’s missing is YOU. Your personality, value in building relationships, and online identity are still not fully formed if all you’ve done is merely join LinkedIn.

So, even if you’re late to the LinkedIn party, here are some steps you can take on the way from novice user to super-connected, job-hunting expert: Continue reading “Why Just Joining LinkedIn Is Not Enough”