How to Win Attention With a Powerful Executive Resume

A compelling executive resume starts with relevant details and personal branding strategy

I recently talked with Tim Muma, Radio Program Coordinator at LocalJobNetwork.com, for the site’s new series Executive Decisions. What did we focus on? The executive resume, of course.

Tim had fantastic questions, with no topic off-limits. Why does an executive even need a resume? Won’t they just be recruited directly? Well, that would be nice, but it doesn’t quite happen that way.

Even if you’re directly recruited, you’ll suddenly get asked for your resume… and that’s where you’ll wish you’d taken the time to produce a strong story (or at least the one that gets an employer to take action).

And what should be on that resume when it finally makes it into the hands of decision-makers? If you’ve read my tips in the past, you know that metrics are what I emphasize. The scope and percentages behind your work are critical.

You can hear the details, including my strategies for connecting your job title and seemingly disjointed work experience into a cohesive story, here.

Enjoy! (Thank you, Tim.)

Need a competitive edge in your job search? As an award-winning executive resume writer, I create branded, powerful resumes and LinkedIn Profiles that position you as the #1 candidate.

My clients win interviews at Fortune 500 firms including Citibank, Google, Disney, and Pfizer, plus niche companies, start-ups, and emerging industry leaders.

Get in touch with me to experience the outstanding results I can bring to your transition.

– Laura Smith-Proulx, CCMC, CPRW, CPBA, TCCS, COPNS, CIC

Is Your Executive Resume Missing a Title?

Resume TitleDid you write your leadership resume around a clear job target – or merely leave clues for employers to find?

If you’ve ever suffered through reading a stack of resumes – hoping the perfect candidate will nearly jump off the page, then you’ll understand the conundrum faced by employers.

Many resumes are written using generalities, leaving recruiters or employers to guess at your desired job goal… following the bread-crumb trail of previous positions and skills to figure out exactly why you’re their prime executive candidate!

Seriously, if employers can’t seem to piece together the reasons you’re applying (never mind the reasons you’re a perfect fit!), then your executive resume might be missing an important element:  a title.

A resume title, which is typically a short phrase or job title used at the top of your resume, helps readers understand the role you’re pursuing.

If done correctly, it also leaves them anticipating the supporting details of your story. You DO want them to read further, right?

As shown in this example of a CFO resume, the executive resume title can also replace the overused “Professional Qualifications” or “Summary” category at the top of the resume. (Do you really need these words to introduce the summary of your career? Probably not.)

The advantage of using a title? Your job target will be immediately obvious, and employers will tend to read further, rather than eliminating your resume at first glance.

Even if you’re open to different positions (as illustrated by this sample CEO and SVP resume), you can specify more than one goal. Of course, these job targets should be similar enough to use a common resume; otherwise, you may need another version.

As you can see, boldly titling your executive resume will direct employers to pay attention to your strong points – helping them quickly understand how you fit into their operation.

Need a competitive edge in your job search? As an award-winning executive resume writer, I create branded, powerful resumes and LinkedIn Profiles that position you as the #1 candidate.

My clients win interviews at Fortune 500 firms including Citibank, Google, Disney, and Pfizer, plus niche companies, start-ups, and emerging industry leaders.

Get in touch with me to experience the outstanding results I can bring to your transition.

– Laura Smith-Proulx, CCMC, CPRW, CPBA, TCCS, COPNS, CIC

How to Write a Compelling COO Resume

cooexecutiveTransitioning into a COO role – or taking the next step from GM or VP of Operations?

To be competitive, your COO resume must deliver a quick, yet potent snapshot of strategic leadership and tactical qualifications.

In today’s job market, most COOs direct broad functions such as marketing, production, sales, and technology, while presenting strategic ideas to the Board and playing a large part in company growth.

Management and team direction, profit growth, process improvement, quality standards, cost savings, and promotional acumen can be equally paramount to a strategic vision that drives bottom-line results.

Therefore, your COO resume will need to demonstrate both detailed success stories and an overarching message of leadership.

If you’re struggling to combine these elements into your COO resume, use these tips and examples as guides to a strong picture of success at the executive level:

1 – Add Success Stories (in Context!).

Your career story is often more engaging when told from the standpoint of problems solved, challenges overcome, or roadblocks removed.

Therefore, you’ll want to include descriptions of the situations behind each result for greater impact. As an example, the second page of this COO sample resume contains details of Crisis & Change Leadership that show $1.2 million additional claims revenue produced when the COO stepped in to take over a management job. Continue reading “How to Write a Compelling COO Resume”

The 5 Essentials of a Powerful VP Sales Resume

VP Sales Resume SampleWant to be considered for a coveted Vice President of Sales role – with a leadership resume that promotes you far above a Sales Manager or Director?

You’ll face an uphill battle if you rely solely on the same metrics and quota figures that nailed your current position.

Here’s why: employers assume that a VP-level sales leader will have already mastered the art of building relationships, training sales teams, and exceeding objectives. Most Sales Managers or Directors aiming for the VP slot have proven that they can close deals and surpass expectations!

What your resume REALLY needs to make it past the gatekeeper for a VP Sales job are these 5 elements, strategically positioned on your executive resume to illustrate your readiness to take the helm of an entire Sales organization: Continue reading “The 5 Essentials of a Powerful VP Sales Resume”

Think Your Resume’s Ready for 2013? Read This First

Executive reading your resumeDetermined to make 2013 the year you snag that dream job?

The coming months are shaping up to be intensively competitive, meaning you’ll have to be ready to edge out others for that coveted job.

However, if your resume is like most in circulation, it isn’t anywhere near ready for 2013. Why?

Because it probably relies on outdated methods, lacks marketing appeal, or just downright fails to demonstrate the kind of value proposition that captures attention in a crowded market (no matter what year it is).

Here are 5 telltale signs your resume will fall flat in 2013 (along with tips for hitting the mark):

1 – You’ve never considered using an infographic or chart to display your achievements.

Nothing speaks louder than metrics on a resume, but possibly nothing shouts accomplishment and scale more so than a chart.

These graphics are easy to insert into a Word document with the Insert Chart tool. However, you should only use one if you have impressive numbers to display (as shown in this sample of a VP Sales resume). Continue reading “Think Your Resume’s Ready for 2013? Read This First”