How to Find Recruiters For Your Job Search

executiverecruiterPerhaps you’ve decided to reach out to recruiters as a means of accessing potential opportunities at your leadership career level.

If so, how do you find the best executive recruiters for your situation? Many recruiters work nationally and globally, making it difficult to pinpoint the best resources.

You can get in touch with colleagues for a referral, as suggested by the NY Times in Recruiting a Recruiter for Your Next Job, which also outlines steps to take once you’ve found a good contact name.

(Of course, since executive recruiters are tasked with identifying optimum leadership candidates for their client companies, there will also be due diligence on their part to vet YOU.)

With a little resourcefulness, you can also perform online searches to find and build relationships with executive recruiters who are familiar with your field (and potentially, your target companies).

Try these 3 resources to identify potential recruiting agencies for your executive job search:

1 – Locate Recruiters Using LinkedIn.

Executive recruiters are easily findable on LinkedIn with a few simple search techniques. First of all, get familiar with the Advanced People Search function (which will make your life easier throughout your job search).

From any page in LinkedIn, you will see a  use the drop-down menu at the top right, which typically defaults to ”People.” Next to it, you’ll see Advanced – click on this word to access Advanced People Search. Continue reading

How to Conduct a Holiday Job Search For Fast Results – Downloadable via Amazon

Think you have to stop job searching during the holidays because “no one hires” until January?

Nothing could be further from the truth.

In fact, New Year, New Job! How to Use the Holidays to Advance Your Job Search, a 99-cent download on Amazon from Job-Hunt.org, will quickly convince you to accelerate your efforts right now.

Getting in front of employers during November and December can yield surprisingly fast results. In fact, it’s often much easier to look for the perfect job NOW.

As Job-Hunt.org’s LinkedIn for Job Search Expert, I’ve shared insights on the best ways to update your LinkedIn Profile, use LinkedIn to get in front of hiring managers, reach out to former colleagues, and other holiday-season insights (but they’re in this book only!).

Your downloaded e-book includes cutting-edge tips on how to contact recruiters, enhance your personal brand, network at holiday parties, set up interview appointments, leverage social media, and other ideas, all customized to holiday job search in 2012 and beyond.

Get your copy and start learning how to navigate the job search this holiday season.

Why I’ll Never Critique Your Resume

Frequently, I encounter job seekers who are trying to find out what, if anything, might be missing from their resume.

Of course, they also ask what I’d do to improve it.

These are valid questions, and in such a competitive market, it makes sense for candidates to request this type of feedback.

However, I won’t do it.

Why not? There’s simply no way, other than getting to know the twists and turns of your professional story, to figure out if your resume truly does its job for you.

No matter what I (or any other resume writer) thinks of your resume, it must contain a full, context-based story of your career and specific value-add… and it’s impossible to figure out what might be missing at a glance!

Yes, this is contrary to the “free critique” offered by so many job boards or career services.

Sure, we can debate keywords, presentation, content, borders, and formatting all day, but at the end of the discussion, all you’ll have is yet another opinion.

So what WILL happen when you ask me to look at your resume? I’ll have 3 questions for you:

  • What job are you targeting?
  • How well does the resume capture your competitive edge for this job?
  • Does it generate the results you want?

These 3 factors tell me more about the likely success of your resume than any opinion I could put forth. They also give me a clear picture of the type of professional assistance (if any) that you’ll need to achieve your goal.

The way your work affects the bottom line (your personal brand, as we say) must be conveyed clearly and strongly, and to the right audience, in order for employers to take notice.

And in the end, that’s all that matters when it comes to resume effectiveness.

Are You Over-Sharing On LinkedIn?

LinkedIn—that all-purpose gathering place for professionals, recruiters, and employers—allows you to converse with like-minded experts in your field, learn about industry-specific topics and events, post resume information, and send private messages to employers in hopes of securing that perfect job.

However, if you’re divulging too-personal details, or letting others have uncomfortably close insight into your job search, it can take longer to find a suitable job – or you can be blacklisted entirely by recruiters.

If you’ve started to confuse LinkedIn connections for your Facebook friends, it’s time to take a step back and consider whether you’re harming your job search.

Here are some signs that you’re wading too deep into personal territory on LinkedIn:

1 – Posting negative comments about your job search in a LinkedIn Group.

While it’s perfectly normal to be frustrated with a job search that’s taking too long, LinkedIn is not the place to blow off steam about prospective employers, HR contacts, or recruiters.

Yet, you can peruse Groups forums and find this type of activity nearly every day, with disgruntled professionals posting information about negative exchanges with employers, and the occasional rant against a particular company or hiring manager. Continue reading