Why You’ll Benefit From Using LinkedIn Publishing for Your Job Search

LinkedIn Publishing PlatformIf you haven’t tried LinkedIn’s Publishing platform for your job search, you’re missing a HUGE opportunity to promote your personal brand and leadership skills to employers.

There’s no limit to the topics or volume of posts allowed per user, and with an international recruiting audience ready at your virtual feet, there’s no reason to hold back!

Still hesitant? Consider these near-instant benefits to your job search from publishing:

1 – LinkedIn will help promote your Publishing activity.

When your connections log into the site, they’ll get a notification about your new post – and this may inspire them to pass it along via social media and share it throughout LinkedIn. Keep in mind this is a double-edged sword: in the same manner as your articles are promoted, others’ posts will appear in your notifications feed. (There’s no way to turn these messages off.)

You can push your message further into cyberspace, of course, through Twitter, Pinterest, Facebook, and any other social media venue, and also post your article in Groups.

2 – You’ll widen your audience through Google and other search engines.

Remember – you’re not just publishing an article, you’re promoting your expertise to employers and your industry. Similar to your Profile, the more keywords you include (in your article Headline) will draw traffic from search engines and social media.

This means you’ll get substantial exposure from both inside and outside the site. If you’re “writing what you know” (which is LinkedIn’s publishing platform mantra), you’ll gain a new audience and spotlight for your skills, particularly from recruiters, who are often avid search engine users.

Case in point:  my post entitled “Is It a Good Idea to Add a Consulting Job on LinkedIn When You’re Unemployed?” appeared on page 1 of Google within just days of publication.

3 – You’re already spending time on LinkedIn – where employers are hunting for your talents.

One of the best advantages to being active on LinkedIn is the exposure to recruiters sourcing candidates with your expertise. If you’re also using the Publishing Platform, you’ll be in an even better position to stand out among other candidates. Posts stay on your Profile and are shown in your activity, so there’s no way employers can miss them. If you have a change of heart about your Publisher article, LinkedIn says you can delete it.

Of course, I recommend some keyword and industry research BEFORE you publish in order to maximize your results. For example, these topics could be relevant for executive job seekers:

Supply Chain Executive

  • 2 ways to cut procurement costs in your global supply chain
  • How international sourcing can speed up your operation

IT Director

  • Cloud storage in your IT operation: how much is enough?
  • 3 reasons your disaster recovery plan could fail during a hurricane

Try to post at least twice per month to keep your articles in rotation. Stumped for new ideas? Look at hot-button issues facing your target employers and then design your posts to show how you’d solve these problems (similar to an interview answer).

Of course, you should ALWAYS ensure your LinkedIn Publishing activity supports (vs. damages) your job search. Even though you can delete a post, other members could find a way to archive it or quote you. 

Write your LinkedIn article in a positive, professional tone – avoiding rants or subjects designed to provoke an argument. Ensure the content aligns with your personal brand, thoroughly proofread it for typos and missed words, and ask trusted colleagues to look it over.

Happy publishing!

Executive Resume Writer

Need a competitive edge in your job search? As an award-winning executive resume writer, I create branded, powerful resumes and LinkedIn Profiles that position you as the #1 candidate.

My clients win interviews and top C-suite, EVP, VP, and Director positions at Fortune 500 firms, niche companies, start-ups, and emerging industry leaders, using powerhouse documents and executive job search techniques tailored to today’s job market.

Get in touch with me to experience the outstanding results I can bring to your transition.

– Laura Smith-Proulx, CCMC, CPRW, CPBA, TCCS, COPNS, CIC, CTTCC

How to Write a High-ROI, Branded Cover Letter

Writing Cover LetterIn my work as an executive resume writer, I often have the opportunity to work with leadership candidates on thoughtful cover letters and resumes, so I enjoyed talking with Leslie Stevens-Huffman of Dice.com for her insightful article, 10 Ways to Screw Up Your Cover Letter.

As she notes, your job search can stall if your cover letter fails to show your value or if you obviously haven’t taken the time to learn about the employer’s business.

Unfortunately, the job market still abounds with cover letters that look like templates – or that only rehash the resume (even at an executive level!).

So… what SHOULD you do when putting together a compelling cover letter? Try these tips for a powerful, standout document that cuts to your ROI and exemplifies your personal brand: Continue reading “How to Write a High-ROI, Branded Cover Letter”

What’s The Secret to Getting Hired From LinkedIn? (Part 5: Your Follow-Up)

LinkedIn Follow-upNot sure why LinkedIn isn’t working for your job search? 

If so, you’ll need to check out these strategies used by successful job hunters:

Here’s the last, critical step in getting results from LinkedIn:

5 – You DO need to use LinkedIn for follow-up.

Applying to an online posting (on LinkedIn or elsewhere) is no longer a good idea without some form of follow-up.

If you have any way of finding out the company name, great. If you have any method of getting the hiring manager’s name, excellent!

To access this information, comb through a list of employees at the target company (perform a Company Search on LinkedIn, of course). Identify the most likely person there who would hire you (usually 1 or 2 levels above your ideal job).

Next, read the company’s press and look at what’s going on in the industry. Your mission is to determine their pain points. Why do they need to hire you? What’s happening in this company that requires your expertise?

Then, use the contact name you identified to reach out. Send an email, LinkedIn InMail, or even an FedEx overnight letter. Explain that you applied online and want to follow up, or better yet, explain how you’ve identified the key areas of need at this company, and how you can help.

Whether you’re doing this in reply to an online job announcement, or just looking at likely employers to pursue, the process is the same. See how much more personal and focused you can be with this approach?

In short, if you’re still wondering if you missed the LinkedIn train to job search success, the answer is yes.

Now go out and sharpen your approach with these extra steps to get more employer attention!

Need a competitive edge in your job search?

As an award-winning executive resume writer, I create branded, powerful resumes and LinkedIn Profiles that position you as the #1 candidate – PLUS arm you with the job search tools that will get you hired faster.

My clients win interviews at Fortune 500 firms including Citibank, Google, Disney, and Pfizer, plus niche companies, start-ups, and emerging industry leaders.

Get in touch with me to experience the outstanding results my expertise can bring to your transition.

– Laura Smith-Proulx, CCMC, CPRW, CPBA, TCCS, COPNS, CIC 

Do You Really Need a Cover Letter For Executive Jobs?

Invariably, when executives try to figure out how to stand out in the job search, the subject of cover letters comes up – followed by confusion. Do you really need a cover letter for each executive job application? How can you be sure that employers are actually reading the letter you’re so carefully crafting?

cover letter for executives
Do you really need a cover letter for executive jobs?

Is it a myth that a cover letter can distinguish you in the executive job search? Here are 3 key points to consider when it comes to the cover letter question:

1 – Yes, cover letters are read by (some) employers.

However, this varies among different companies and their hiring practices. This informal survey from About.com shows some hiring managers are emphatic that a great cover letter will boost your chances of being selected for a choice interview. Studies in the careers industry also consistently nearly two-thirds of hiring authorities read cover letters, and of that group, nearly 50% consider them crucial.  You’ll never know at the outset which third of hiring managers you’re dealing with, of course. Therefore, it’s better to be prepared with a strong personal brand message encapsulated in a cover letter, than to lose out on a great opportunity.  Continue reading “Do You Really Need a Cover Letter For Executive Jobs?”

How to Find Recruiters For Your Job Search

executiverecruiterPerhaps you’ve decided to reach out to recruiters as a means of accessing potential opportunities at your leadership career level.

If so, how do you find the best executive recruiters for your situation? Many recruiters work nationally and globally, making it difficult to pinpoint the best resources.

You can get in touch with colleagues for a referral, as suggested by the NY Times in Recruiting a Recruiter for Your Next Job, which also outlines steps to take once you’ve found a good contact name.

(Of course, since executive recruiters are tasked with identifying optimum leadership candidates for their client companies, there will also be due diligence on their part to vet YOU.)

With a little resourcefulness, you can also perform online searches to find and build relationships with executive recruiters who are familiar with your field (and potentially, your target companies).

Try these 3 resources to identify potential recruiting agencies for your executive job search:

1 – Locate Recruiters Using LinkedIn.

Executive recruiters are easily findable on LinkedIn with a few simple search techniques. First of all, get familiar with the Advanced People Search function (which will make your life easier throughout your job search).

From any page in LinkedIn, you will see a  use the drop-down menu at the top right, which typically defaults to ”People.” Next to it, you’ll see Advanced – click on this word to access Advanced People Search. Continue reading “How to Find Recruiters For Your Job Search”

How to Conduct a Holiday Job Search For Fast Results – Downloadable via Amazon

Think you have to stop job searching during the holidays because “no one hires” until January?

Nothing could be further from the truth.

In fact, New Year, New Job! How to Use the Holidays to Advance Your Job Search, a 99-cent download on Amazon from Job-Hunt.org, will quickly convince you to accelerate your efforts right now.

Getting in front of employers during November and December can yield surprisingly fast results. In fact, it’s often much easier to look for the perfect job NOW.

As Job-Hunt.org’s LinkedIn for Job Search Expert, I’ve shared insights on the best ways to update your LinkedIn Profile, use LinkedIn to get in front of hiring managers, reach out to former colleagues, and other holiday-season insights (but they’re in this book only!).

Your downloaded e-book includes cutting-edge tips on how to contact recruiters, enhance your personal brand, network at holiday parties, set up interview appointments, leverage social media, and other ideas, all customized to holiday job search in 2012 and beyond.

Get your copy and start learning how to navigate the job search this holiday season.

Why I’ll Never Critique Your Resume

Frequently, I encounter job seekers who are trying to find out what, if anything, might be missing from their resume.

Of course, they also ask what I’d do to improve it.

These are valid questions, and in such a competitive market, it makes sense for candidates to request this type of feedback.

However, I won’t do it.

Why not? There’s simply no way, other than getting to know the twists and turns of your professional story, to figure out if your resume truly does its job for you.

No matter what I (or any other resume writer) thinks of your resume, it must contain a full, context-based story of your career and specific value-add… and it’s impossible to figure out what might be missing at a glance!

Yes, this is contrary to the “free critique” offered by so many job boards or career services.

Sure, we can debate keywords, presentation, content, borders, and formatting all day, but at the end of the discussion, all you’ll have is yet another opinion.

So what WILL happen when you ask me to look at your resume? I’ll have 3 questions for you:

  • What job are you targeting?
  • How well does the resume capture your competitive edge for this job?
  • Does it generate the results you want?

These 3 factors tell me more about the likely success of your resume than any opinion I could put forth. They also give me a clear picture of the type of professional assistance (if any) that you’ll need to achieve your goal.

The way your work affects the bottom line (your personal brand, as we say) must be conveyed clearly and strongly, and to the right audience, in order for employers to take notice.

And in the end, that’s all that matters when it comes to resume effectiveness.