executive_resume_headlinesFacing the task of writing a resume that conveys your effectiveness as a leader?

Heard the buzz around personal branding in executive job search?

Maybe you’re confused about how to blend these concepts to create a powerful executive resume, but take heart. Building a strong, personally branded executive resume is easier than you think.

The trick? Think in terms of headlines.

Headlines, or taglines, in executive resumes are a new concept, but an easy one to grasp and implement (especially if you’re struggling to write about yourself!). While they may seem like “extra” words to place in your resume, their purpose is to steer the reader toward notable accomplishments that prove your value.

Try these headline tips to inject your executive resume with a dose of power and confidence:

1 – Add a descriptive document headline showing your reputation for results.

As shown in this award-winning CFO resume sample, the first headline (Senior Executive Team Member Enabling Triple Revenue & Profit Results in 4 Years) shows the candidate’s career level and most noteworthy achievements.

You can easily do this for yourself b y stringing together your job function (President, IT Director, COO, etc.), along with a short description of your performance (Leading Sales Growth, Delivering On-Time Projects).

After writing your headline, simply place it under your Resume Title to expand on your worth as a leader, as in these examples:

Managing Director – CEO:  Executive Leader for Multinational Portfolio Companies

Business Development Executive:  Sales Driver Behind Millions in Revenue

2 – Group achievements under a job-title headline detailing company-specific achievements.

In the same example of a CFO resume, the first page shows company names, job titles, and a brief description of accomplishments (Building Pro Plus: CFO Enabling Peak Profitability With Sharply Reduced Costs) and (Sam’s Club & Wal-Mart: Multi-Divisional CFP Championing Card Portfolio & Cash Improvements).

These headlines, unlike the main one described in the first tip, are company-specific and point to the wealth of achievements you’ve attained in each position.

Consider grouping a list of success stories for each job under this type of headline, using a similar formula (Company: Job Title and Achievements), as shown in these examples:

Operations Director Stabilizing Manufacturing Plants & Empowering Teams

Hotel GM Delivering 145% EBITDA Increase Through Capital Improvements

3 – Supply a headline for each group of success stories in your career.

Throughout the same CFO sample resume, you’ll see sentences used to summarize achievements, set off by a different font color and border (Steered Operation to Rapid Profits From Across-The-Board Improvements) and (Set Stage for Exponential Growth by Eliciting Excellence in Performance).

The key to these statements? Write the achievement sentences first, then provide a summary sentence for each group.

For example, a sales executive who increased market share could add this headline: Displaced Competition in Named Accounts With New Customer Relationships.

In other words, keep your headline simple and related to the successes you want to emphasize.

In summary, headlines can be placed in multiple sections of your executive resume to help guide employers to relevant content.

In doing so, you’ll be able to easily highlight a strong personal brand message and distinguish yourself as a leadership candidate.

Executive Resume Writing Services

Need a competitive edge in your job search? As an award-winning executive resume writer, I create branded, powerful resumes and LinkedIn Profiles that position you as the #1 candidate.

My clients win interviews at Fortune 500 firms including Citibank, Google, Disney, and Pfizer, plus niche companies, start-ups, and emerging industry leaders.

Get in touch with me to experience the outstanding results I can bring to your transition.

– Laura Smith-Proulx, CCMC, CPRW, CPBA, TCCS, COPNS, CIC, CTTCC

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