How to Stop Your Work Anniversary Notifications on LinkedIn

LinkedIn Work AnniversaryDo you get annoyed with the flood of “Congratulations!” notes on LinkedIn every time your work anniversary rolls around?

If so, I have a simple fix for this problem: remove the Months on your jobs in the Experience section.

To do this, simply go to your current job on LinkedIn while in Edit mode, and select “Choose” instead of specifying the month. Hit Save and you’re done!

I can’t take credit for figuring out how to stop your Work Anniversary messages from being issued on LinkedIn. It’s just that I’ve never used months on jobs, and therefore never had this problem.

Note: there isn’t a way to stop the Work Anniversary notifications coming from your connections, at least not yet.

Need a competitive edge for your executive job search?

As the #1 U.S. TORI award-winning executive resume writer, I create branded, powerful resumes and LinkedIn Profiles that position you as the #1 candidate – PLUS arm you with the job search tools that will get you hired faster.

My clients win interviews at Fortune 500 firms including Citibank, Google, Disney, and Pfizer, plus niche-market companies, start-ups, and emerging industry leaders.

Get in touch with me to experience the outstanding results my expertise can bring to your transition.

- Laura Smith-Proulx, CCMC, CPRW, CPBA, TCCS, COPNS, CIC 

3 Executive Resume Mistakes You’re Making Right Now

Executive resume mistakes

Trying to catch a break in the competitive market for executive talent? Your resume MUST be on par with the branded, value-driven documents used by other leaders.

As an executive expecting to make your mark, you’ll need to avoid the typical (yet major-league) resume writing errors that can put you at a disadvantage.

Sharpen your approach and position yourself as a contender by checking your executive resume against these too-common resume writing mistakes: Continue reading

How to Write a CFO Resume That Reflects Your Leadership Brand

Pursuing your next step up the career ladder as CFO, Controller, or Director FP&A? How to Write a CFO Resume

Your executive resume will need to make a convincing leap from financial systems oversight to strategic executive advisor and team member.

Many CFOs serve as a right-hand to the CEO for strategic decision-making and forecasting, direct the CIO, boost cash flow, present growth strategies to the Board, or drive improvements in financial reporting – all relevant areas of leadership that must be highlighted on a CFO resume.

To properly brand yourself as a senior executive leader poised for a prime C-suite opportunity, use these steps to write a knockout CFO resume:

1 – Evaluate your leadership brand as a CFO candidate.

All of us have a personal brand, but we can be unaware of it (until needing to capture the message for a job search). So, take stock of your reputation as a first step! Continue reading

5 Best-Practice LinkedIn Strategies for Executives

linkedinonphoneCautiously readying your LinkedIn Profile for an executive job search?

You’ll need to consider LinkedIn strategies that differ substantially from those used by mid-career professionals.

For example, many executives choose to limit the information they distribute on LinkedIn, due to company confidentiality or other reasons. Executives are also approached more often than other users on LinkedIn, either as a potential employer or by a recruiter piqued by their qualifications.

This activity can call for a more toned-down presence on the site – while still conveying a strong leadership message.

Consider implementing these changes to cultivate a powerful, yet discreet LinkedIn presence supporting your strategically planned executive job search: Continue reading

Is Your Executive Resume Missing a Title?

Resume TitleDid you write your leadership resume around a clear job target – or merely leave clues for employers to find?

If you’ve ever suffered through reading a stack of resumes – hoping the perfect candidate will nearly jump off the page, then you’ll understand the conundrum faced by employers.

Many resumes are written using generalities, leaving recruiters or employers to guess at your desired job goal… following the bread-crumb trail of previous positions and skills to figure out exactly why you’re their prime executive candidate!

Seriously, if employers can’t seem to piece together the reasons you’re applying (never mind the reasons you’re a perfect fit!), then your executive resume might be missing an important element:  a title.

A resume title, which is typically a short phrase or job title used at the top of your resume, helps readers understand the role you’re pursuing.

If done correctly, it also leaves them anticipating the supporting details of your story. You DO want them to read further, right?

As shown in this example of a CFO resume, the executive resume title can also replace the overused “Professional Qualifications” or “Summary” category at the top of the resume. (Do you really need these words to introduce the summary of your career? Probably not.)

The advantage of using a title? Your job target will be immediately obvious, and employers will tend to read further, rather than eliminating your resume at first glance.

Even if you’re open to different positions (as illustrated by this sample CEO and SVP resume), you can specify more than one goal. Of course, these job targets should be similar enough to use a common resume; otherwise, you may need another version.

As you can see, boldly titling your executive resume will direct employers to pay attention to your strong points – helping them quickly understand how you fit into their operation.

Need a competitive edge in your job search? As an award-winning executive resume writer, I create branded, powerful resumes and LinkedIn Profiles that position you as the #1 candidate.

My clients win interviews at Fortune 500 firms including Citibank, Google, Disney, and Pfizer, plus niche companies, start-ups, and emerging industry leaders.

Get in touch with me to experience the outstanding results I can bring to your transition.

- Laura Smith-Proulx, CCMC, CPRW, CPBA, TCCS, COPNS, CIC

Think Your Resume’s Ready for 2013? Read This First

Executive reading your resumeDetermined to make 2013 the year you snag that dream job?

The coming months are shaping up to be intensively competitive, meaning you’ll have to be ready to edge out others for that coveted job.

However, if your resume is like most in circulation, it isn’t anywhere near ready for 2013. Why?

Because it probably relies on outdated methods, lacks marketing appeal, or just downright fails to demonstrate the kind of value proposition that captures attention in a crowded market (no matter what year it is).

Here are 5 telltale signs your resume will fall flat in 2013 (along with tips for hitting the mark):

1 – You’ve never considered using an infographic or chart to display your achievements.

Nothing speaks louder than metrics on a resume, but possibly nothing shouts accomplishment and scale more so than a chart.

These graphics are easy to insert into a Word document with the Insert Chart tool. However, you should only use one if you have impressive numbers to display (as shown in this sample of a VP Sales resume). Continue reading

Best Tech Sales Resume Tips to Outdo Your Competition

Pursuing your next career move in technical sales?

Your resume isn’t the list of sales quotas and jargon that it once was - even if that’s what landed your last job.

An effective resume in the technical field for any sales position (Pre-Sales Engineer, Sales Account Representative, Partner Alliances, etc.), must hone in on your sales style, consultative abilities, quantifiable achievements, and span of influence.

Outpace your competition and make a bigger impact on employers with these technical sales resume elements:

1 – Technology Brands.

As seen in this Technical Sales resume example, brand names often capture interest, especially if they reflect the type of technology you’ll want to work with in the future. Therefore, this resume uses a brand name in the first, eye-catching headline. Continue reading

Simple Ways to Reinforce Your Brand Message With Resume Headings

Writing your resume to attract the kind of attention your career deserves is a challenge. Content is critical… but your formatting and strategy are equally important!

One of the best resume branding techniques (that can escape your notice even if you review executive resume samples) is changing resume section headings for greater impact.

An easy way to reinforce your personal brand message, descriptive headings give your reader a heads-up on the value of your experience, education, or achievements.

Classic headings, of course, are important for getting your resume past automated systems (see Making Your Resume Format Machine-Friendly for tips). However, you’ll also need HUMAN readers to take note of your qualifications.

Use these ideas to jumpstart creative thinking for each section of your resume, with branded, innovative headings that hammer home your promise of value:

Your Professional Experience.

There’s no law that requires your experience to be contained in a section called Work History.

What about Sales Achievements and Performance or Technical Leadership Experience? Why not try Operations Management Career if your focus is a new role in manufacturing production or within a call center? Continue reading

Need a Leadership Resume Fast? Don’t Panic

On the receiving end of a recruiter’s call? Found a great job online, but it closes soon?

Your elation can quickly turn to panic, especially if you haven’t updated your resume in some time.

You’ll want to maximize every minute, of course, while creating a document that makes it look as if you’ve spent weeks crafting each word.

Here are 3 shortcuts to reviewing and refreshing your leadership resumeall in short order – to meet the demands of a choice job:

1 – Gather your thoughts.

Before your fingers hit the keyboard to start the resume writing process, take a step back.

Resumes are much more effective if they directly tie your experience to the job, so you’ll need to build your value proposition around this particular role. You can always create a newer version to fit a different job. Continue reading

Is Your Executive Resume Stretched Too Thin?

Recently, I had a conversation with an executive who was concerned about the effectiveness of her resume.

While I can’t comment on how well it represented her (since I’m not familiar with her career), I couldn’t help but notice the diverse job goals listed across the top: “CIO – Operations Director – CEO.”

Wow! That’s a lot to ask of any executive resume – and it’s a lot to hang your professional hat on as well during a job search.

Here’s why: the hiring audience looking for each of those executive leaders will be focused on an entirely different part of your experience and competencies. Continue reading